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Stephanie Shepherd
From February 25th 2000 to April 1st 2000
Cryolite

"Cryolite" is comprised of a structural object and 3D computer animation created by simultaneous degradation and fabrication, similar processes involved in iceberg formation. Icebergs seem so stable, rock solid, the size of buildings. Yet when viewed on the ocean, the icebergs' most salient feature is constantly shifting movement. Calved from glaciers, they come into existence by an abrupt schism. Shaped by outer forces from this point on, iceberg tectonics is determined by entropy and decay.

The inherent structural formlessness of icebergs is characterized by flux, as is their physical orientation and geographic trajectories. Stability is illusory; melting and shifting icebergs can flip over, break into pieces, and be mended into new configurations. Even the tip of the iceberg becomes submerged in water if its center of equilibrium is sufficiently displaced. Propelled by ocean currents, icebergs travel in eccentric paths - they meander.

An iconic image of the north, the iceberg nonetheless undergoes an inevitable pull to the south. Schemes exist to tow them to subtropical countries as a source of fresh water. Alien in a saline environment, fresh water icebergs are gradually diminished, worn away by the water supporting and shaping them.

Despite the apparent weight and density of the visible iceberg, 7/8 of its mass remains submerged underwater and left to our imagination. The proverbial tip of the iceberg represents at once what is seen and not seen. In this exhibition, the paradoxical nature of the unpredictable iceberg is examined by two surrogate forms. One constructed and the other simulated, they are improbable designs for "Cryolite".

Stephanie Shepherd has a BSc in Zoology from the University of Guelph, an A.O.C.A. from the Ontario College of Art, and an M.F.A. from Concordia University. Her recent exhibitions include "Drifters / À la dérive", a computer simulation in the Media Room at Articule (Montreal), "48 Rooms / 48 Hours", installations in a former Montreal rooming house, "À Point", featuring Montréal and Toronto photo-digital artists, in the Belgo Building (Montreal), and "Death of the Party", at Quartier Éphémère (Montreal). At present she is the Senior Technician of the Visual Arts Macintosh Computer Facilities, Concordia University, Montreal.

Bibliographie
-«Artist-Run Culture», Mix Magazine, vol. 25, no 4, printemps 2000, pp.18-19.