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Laurel Woodcock
From September 7th 2001 to October 13th 2001
Game

Let the games begin. Endgame. Game point. It's a racket out there. She's got game. Even the score. Gamesome. Keep your eye on the ball. No Contest. Game plan. The dating game. Gameness. Gamecock. Game of chance. It's a no win situation. Gamely. Play ball.

On one wall a large DVD projection depicts a head shot of a young woman. At times she appears to be absorbed in concentration, at other moments she is gazing off into space; there are instances of laughter and attempts at non-verbal communication. While the video component to this work acknowledges the performative and unedited aspect of early video and conceptual art, the headphones available on the opposite wall provide a more immediate reference. In separating the visual and aural elements of the work, spectators experience the "game" alone. "Game" enacts the larger metaphor of play within a competitive culture.

The paradoxical phrase sentimental conceptualism perfectly encapsulates Laurel Woodcock's art-making. While informed by conceptual art, her work is infused with humorous and emotive qualities that work to confound the movement's disassociated aesthetic. Her installations merge, in various configurations, time-based media such as video, audio, and DVD's. At times, she invites interaction by proffering mass produced gifts to the gallery visitor. Referencing cinema, popular culture and technology, her installations resonate with wry humour and gentle pathos while staging quietly theoretical propositions.

Her work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, the United States, and Europe. Most recently, Jan Allen curated an overview of Woodcock's work in an exhibition entitled "take me, I'm yours" at The Agnes Etherington Art Centre. She currently lives in Toronto and is Assistant Professor of Video, New Media and Performance at the University of Guelph.

Bibliographie
- Entrevue à Radio CBC (88,5 FM), Émission «The Arts Today» de Will Aitken, 1er octobre 2001.