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Exposition de groupe / Group exhibition
From March 12th 1973 to April 22nd 1973
The Responsible Eye, Three Decades of the Photograph as Document / Trois décennies de photographies documentaires (1930-1960)

Artists : Bob Adelman, Eve Arnold, Werner Bischof, Cornell Capa, Robert Capa, Wilmer Counts, Bruce Davidson, Elliott Erwitt, Robert Frank, Philip Jones-Griffith, Ernst Haas, Charles Harbutt, Erich Hartmann, Sergio Larrain, Erich Lessing, Helen Levitt, Constantine Manos, Wayne Miller, Inge Morath, James Pickerell, Marc Riboud, David Seymour, Dennis Stock, Vytas Valaitis

"The photographs in this show were not assembled with any particular thematic considerations in mind, nor are they part of a curatorial exercise to cast light on the history of the medium. Gathered from private collections, these photographs represent instead an approach : a conviction of the importance of the photograph as public statement and public document. In time, they span nearly thirty years, from the mid-thirties to the mid-sixties, a period that coincided roughly with the ascendancy of the large-circulation picture magazines. They are essentially public photographs, taken by working photographers with a view to having them reproduced in such a way to reach the largest possible audience. Yet they are at the same time strongly personal statements. Although there is little evidence that the photographers were trying to put an autographic stamp on their work, their personal viewpoints and intentions are apparent in many of these images. Today, as photography becomes increasingly academic and introspective, these pictures appear refreshingly spare, unpretentious, and humanistic. Sadly, perhaps, they represent a disappearing approach to the medium."
- Internal document (Optica)