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Murray MacDonald
From October 5th 1982 to October 23rd 1982
Spatial Conjuncts

In MacDonald’s last exhibition at Optica, two and half years ago, the gallery was the site of his large-scale installation Columned. The exhibition this year entitled “Spatial Conjuncts” consists of several small scale pieces constructed during the past twelve months. The plate steel and aluminium pieces were constructed concurrently with the notion that a common problem could be approached through the fabrication of quite dissimilar materials. The artist decided to consider the pieces as active structures suggesting to the observer an orientating presence. MacDonald used aluminium for its reflective qualities, as a counterpoint to the limiting boundaries of the intersection of two walls. Each aluminium piece stands slightly removed from the wall, the angled aluminium planes reflecting images both inward and outward. A visual movement occurs, suggested by proportioned sets of small stairs, which mentally leads the observer into the imagined space created by the reflections. With the heavy plate steel pieces, the floor plane takes on added importance as the fourth side enclosing the interior space. The repetition of arches or places imparts a feeling of movement or direction to this interior space, which in one direction, points to a receding space. Thus, the observer is visually drawn into this enclosed space. In these pieces, both steel and aluminium, the positioning of the observer is important so that the comprehension of real and implied space is complete.
- Press release (Optica)

Murray MacDonald was born in Vancouver in 1947. After having studied art history, architecture and sculpture in North America and Europe, he has had several one-man exhibitions in Montreal, Toronto and Hamilton as well as group exhibitions.