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Adad Hannah
From November 5th 2004 to December 11th 2004
Room 112

"A celebrity is interviewed, a couple fights, a musician is interviewed and subsequently walks out on his girlfriend, an assistant applies powder, a babysitter sends instant messages on a mobile phone while his charges play video games and while these people all remain motionless, Room #112 slowly spins."
-AH

"Room 112" starts with the celebrity interview convention of shot / reverse shot and then expands and disintegrates it as the piece progresses. The hotel room setting serves as the location of any number of events. It is no accident that this is where movie studios choose to make their stars available for interviews, as it is only in such a ‘non-place’ that local Montreal television personality Mosé Persico (the host of Entertainment Spotlight on CFCF, mentioned on several websites as a press-junket-loving sycophant) can sit across from Tom Cruise and have what may resemble a conversation. Whether or not they are in the same room, or simply edited together from an EPK (Electronic Press Kit) distributed by the studio is irrelevant. Each is playing an assigned role in the performance well known as Celebrity Interview.

"Room 112" takes the Celebrity Interview and brings it together with another well worn cliché: the Fighting Couple to create a foursome of Stills that cut back and forth between “correct” and “incorrect” pairings – sometimes showing what we expect to see and other times showing an incongruous or irreconcilable pair. During this splitting of stereotypical scene cells, the cells split again and then again. The result is a video cycle that mimics, fractures, and complicates the generic forms of the most pervasive medium – television. Narrative morsels are given in one scene and then negated in the next. While the room with its red walls, striped couch, and white trim creates a claustrophobic coherence, attempts to join the separate scenes into a meaningful narrative lead to frustration.

Also inspired by the occasional inclusion of lights and producers just before or after a celebrity interview (a new post-modern addition to the television lexicon designed to present celebrities as “real people”), this piece self-consciously exposes the Camera Operator and the Sound Guy - who of course are not recording anything. Just like the recent addition of “behind the scenes” footage shown more and more on mainstream television, this inclusion does not reveal the production process, but rather adds to it another layer of artifice.