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© Julie trudel, Test 44, projet CMYK project, 2011. Acrylique, encre de sérigraphie et gesso sur contreplaqué | Acrylic, silk screen printing ink and gesso on plywood. 35 x 35 cm. Gracieuseté de l’artiste | Courtesy of the artist. Photo : Richard-Max Tremblay.

Julie Trudel
From May 12th 2012 to June 16th 2012
Projet CMYK - phase 2

Julie Trudel endorses a reflexive approach, focusing on the canvas’ production method and the image of the painting itself. She explores the interstices between order and the aleatory, and questions the tensions between constraint and freedom. Her practice rests on a systematic exploration of simple, rigorous, and serially-repeated working protocols, which, paradoxically, involve chance: a restricted colour palette, predefined application procedures, all-over composition. . . Through the repetition of such operations, the selected procedures reveal all their potentiality in paintings of remarkable perceptual complexity.

Thus, Trudel presents “CMYK – phase 2,” a project in which she limits her palette to the four printer colours—cyan, magenta, yellow, and black—the colour model referred to in the title. By imposing such a restraint, the artist avoids the more decorative considerations derived from the mix of pink, grey, and yellow selected from a Web chart for her previous series, titled “rgb(127, 28, 174) rgb(238, 238, 0) rgb(229, 229, 229),” the internationally recognized acronym recalling the three additive primary colours (red, green, blue) from which the typically digital RGB colour space is derived. The body of work exhibited at OPTICA rather variegates on combinations derived from the subtractive colour process, as the secondary colours green, violet or vermilion appear throughout Trudel’s controlled drippings, in puddles and tondi.

Indeed, drip by drip, the primary pigments blend together, physically and optically, thanks to the skillful mix of industrial water-based screenprinting inks and transparent acrylic paint, dilutions and alternations for which the instructions are carefully recorded by the artist on the back each work. In fact, she declares an interest in “the entropy of colour mixing,” an exploration closely tied to the materiality and creative process of the painting, beyond strictly visual considerations. Possible references to the Plasticiens (Claude Tousignant), Color Field Painting (Kenneth Noland), and Op Art (Bridget Riley), among others, are fully acknowledged. Trudel’s practice is in line with a real tradition of creative research in abstract painting, which she proves a fertile ground.

Geneviève Bédard

The artist thanks the Canada Council for the Arts, L’aire libre and l’Atelier Clark.

Julie Trudel's "Projet CMYK - phase 2" was the subject of an article by Sophie Busby published on The Belgo Report, Optica - Projet CMYK -phase 2 (The Belgo Report, May 30th 2012) and a Radio capsule has been broadcast during the In situ radio show, aired on CIBL, June 5th, at 7pm. Capsule : Julie Trudel (In situ, June 5th 2012)



Julie Trudel has taken part in numerous group shows, including “Collison 8” (Parisian Laundry, 2012), “(Re)penser la peinture” (Lilian Rodriguez, 2011), and “Peinture fraîche et nouvelle construction” (Galerie Art Mûr, 2010). She recently presented her first solo exhibition, “Projet CMYK – phase 1,” at the Maison de la culture Maisonneuve, marking the end of her master’s studies in visual and media arts at UQAM. A semifinalist at the RBC Canadian Painting Competition (Power Plant, Toronto, 2011), she was awarded a grant from the Canada Council for the Arts (2012), and her paintings are part of several private collections in Canada and in France.