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© Rodney LaTourelle, Winnipeg Supply, 2012. Acier, bois, peinture nacrée | Steel , wood, pearlescent paint. 25 m2. Avec l'aimable autorisation de la Winnipeg Art Gallery | Courtesy of the Winnipeg Art Gallery.
Photo : Elaine Stocki.

Rodney LaTourelle
From May 11th 2013 to June 15th 2013
Chromakenón

Rodney LaTourelle’s practice, a combination of architecture and visual art, explores affective relationships between colour and various spatial arrangements. Three-dimensional painted and custom-made environments establish an unfettered, geometric visual language the structured aspect of which changes with the spectator’s experience. Dealing with notions related to metaphysics and phenomenology that activate perceptual effects produced by the body and mind, his work is conceived around immersive installations built at various scales. He is currently focused on establishing specific relationships between colour, space, and the body, work that he is pursuing in the space at OPTICA.

Drawing on art history, LaTourelle actualizes various art movements, from the neoplasticism of De Stijl to Hard-edge painting. The outcome is a formal combination connected with architecture that allows him to cast this strict treatment of colour in a mode of contingency and unpredictability. Taking both natural and artificial light into account, these installations augment their perceptual potential by deploying an array of visual and chromatic affects. They transcend the generic sculptural experimentations of minimalism to engage new affective and physical connections, sometimes through the use of mobile structural elements.

And though the space within these installations is empty, the place embodies a dynamic and sometimes labyrinthine receptacle built of many points of entry and exit. Understood as space at once natural and fabricated—a trompe l’oeil that helps “activate colour”—the work gives a predominant role to individual perception. According to Anne-Marie Ninacs, LaTourelle’s work appears to be less interested “in exploring something—an architectural feature, a colour—than in exploration itself as a fundamental means for apprehending the world.”(1) In light of such considerations, these structures that temporarily alter our senses harbour within themselves the complexity of the world.

Julie Alary Lavallée

(1) Anne-Marie Ninacs, Caught in the Act: The Viewer as Performer, exhibition catalogue, October 17, 2008 – February 15, 2009 (National Gallery of Canada, 2008).

The artist thanks Lisa Ames, Ron & Ardis LaTourelle, Louise Whittöft, the Winnipeg Art Gallery (Helen Delacretaz, Chief Curator and Curator, Decorative Arts), l'Atelier Clark, the Manitoba Arts Council, the Canada Council for the Arts and Panolite.



Atelier Clark Panolite


Rodney LaTourelle's Chromakenón is briefly mentionned in Serge Fisette editorial The Adventure Continues... ( ESPACE sculpture, #106, winter 2013-2014).

Born in Winnipeg in 1965, Rodney LaTourelle is an artist, an architect, and a critic. He completed his undergraduate studies in architecture (environmental section) at the University of Manitoba in 1988, and went on to complete a master’s program in landscape architecture in 1996 at the same university. Gathering professional experience as a colour designer, landscape architect, curator, and researcher, he recently co-produced a public sculpture commissioned by the city of the Berlin. His work has been shown several times in North America, including at the National Gallery of Canada and the Cité de l’Énergie, and in Europe, at the Berlin Program Gallery and the SKC Belgrade, in Serbia. He lives and works in Berlin.