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image
© Mathieu Latulippe, La chute, 2013.
Impression jet d’encre | Inkjet print
48 x 68 cm
Avec l'aimable permission de l’artiste | Courtesy of the artist.

Mathieu Latulippe
From May 17th 2014 to June 28th 2014
Retour à Paradise Lost

At one time or another, we have all dreamt of gaining access to a little piece of Paradise. In doing so, we are not always aware of referring to a Christian conception of the world, which is in itself proof that the place is now as much a part of our collective imagination as is, for instance, the Grecian Arcadia. However, when thinking seriously about it, we have difficulty envisioning the idyllic location in an entirely positive light, so closely is it associated with catastrophe and the fall. This is but one manifestation of our difficulty in conceiving an embodied utopia. Today, it would be hard not to imagine this Paradise threatened by industrial progress, whether in the form of pollution or of nuclear contamination. But the true impediment to positively imagining this locus of our origins is surely tied to our ambiguous relationship with nature. While we are inclined to envision this nature garden as benign, fecund, and wholesome, we are also aware that it is a wild environment, untamed, harbouring fierce creatures that are ready to pounce and annihilated us.

In the end, our most cherished dream may likely be to step back into this Paradise, but in the form of a well-controled theme park. Mathieu Latulippe has had the enlightening idea of inviting us on just such an expedition. Of course, it is not a matter here of reconstructing the original Paradise, but of developing a contemporary artificial paradise that resembles, in some respects, our vision of suburbia. Through a series of little scenes—in some of which nature reclaims its rights with a vengeance that can rival disaster movies—the artist affords us a surrogate experience of staggering incommensurability. But this rehabilitated garden of marvels also has a fabular dimension that enjoins us to relish, if only for a moment, in new-found innocence, which may allow us to collectively free ourselves of our millennial fears.
Pierre Rannou

The artist thanks the Canada Council for the Arts, Optica, art3, Atelier Clark, Guy Asselin, Hugo Bergeron, Simon Bilodeau, Pierre Durette, Madeleine Grondin, Jules Lassale, André Latulippe, Frédéric Lavoie, Pierre Rannou and Kerim Yildiz.

Press Review: «Du paradis perdu à la religion de l’art» by Pierre Rannou (Esse arts + opinions, 2015, no 83, pp.42-47), Visite d'atelier : Mathieu Latulippe «Retour à Paradise Lost» by Éloi Desjardins (Un show de mot'arts, May 16 2014), «Tout le monde veut aller au ciel, oui mais personne ne veut mourir» by Normand Babin (Montréalistement, May 31, 2014), and «Paradise Lost : a coup de guano» by Claire Moeder (Ratsdeville, June 13 2014, Jérôme Delgado «Derrière le paradis, la chiante réalité» (Le Devoir, June 8, 2014).

Mathieu Latulippe lives and works in Montreal. He has exhibited in Canada and abroad, at such venues and events as the FIFA, Manif d’Art 4 in Quebec City, Centre de diffusion Clark, the Darling Foundry, the 2011 Québec Triennial at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, and Netwerk, centre d’art contemporain (Belgium).