+ Programming + Archives Décades + News + Publications + Support Optica + Info

Décades

Exhibition

Years
1972 | 1973 | 1974 | 1975 | 1976 | 1977 | 1978 | 1979 | 1980 | 1981 | 1982 | 1983 | 1984 | 1985 | 1986 | 1987 | 1988 | 1989 | 1990 | 1991 | 1992 | 1993 | 1994 | 1995 | 1996 | 1997 | 1998 | 1999 | 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 | 2005 | 2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 |

Index of artists, authors and curators

| A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | R | S | T | U | V | W | Y | Z |

OPTICA Fonds (Concordia University Archives)

Guidebooks to help in consulting the archives

Electronic Reproduction Fees




image
© Karilynn Ming Ho, Where Where There There, 2012. Image tirée d’une monobande, son, installation, 18 min 20 sec. | Single-channel video still, sound, installation, 18 min 20 sec. Avec l’aimable permission de l’artiste | Courtesy of the artist.

Karilynn Ming Ho
From September 6th 2014 to October 18th 2014
Love is Just a Four-Letter Word

*Opening:: Saturday September 6 (3PM)*
Primarily working in video installation, Karilynn Ming Ho looks at the iterative nature of performance and the formal elements of its construction, through a combination of found texts, minimal sets, audio and gestures sourced from high and pop culture. Suturing fragments of acts and a cast of characters, leaving narrative and identity unfixed, she elaborates a complex relationship between the actors and the camera where any sense of before and after is lost within each edit. Her method creates many avenues of interpretation such as the perspective that quintessential repetitions make up everyday life. Most of Ming Ho’s projects foreground ideas based on semiotic forms of production that become replayed with the use of elements pertaining to the cinematic, social, ritual and theatrical grammars. This composite vocabulary allows her to examine how these codification processes function as sites for performativity.

For her latest project, she has created a video work that echoes capitalist behaviour through representations of desire and loss. It addresses the way in which the love song and the montage reflect the nature of the market, a continuous rise and fall, inflation and recession, falling in love, and then falling apart. According to the artist, “the market produces desiring bodies capitalizing on an economy of emotions, projecting a “love” that is insatiable, unattainable and ultimately an illusion; a desire that can never be fulfilled, keeping us wanting more”.1 For Ming Ho, performance and capitalism share a repetitive pattern involving a multiplicity of performing bodies and objects in an ongoing drive for more and an endless perceived lack that finds its re-enactment through language, gestures and objects. While analyzing this dynamic, her art also broaches the body’s inseparability from its image. In fact, screen-culture and the Internet have created a stage which engenders for Ming Ho multiple scripts and spaces of performativity, allowing her to draw upon the endless influx of photos and videos uploaded daily and to depict the ubiquity of language and gestures in today’s cultural climate. It is through this imbrication of body and image that Ming Ho explores how the screen has turned us all into performing subjects.

1. Karilynn Ming Ho, Preparatory notes, 2014.

Karina Irvine

Karina Irvine is an emerging writer and curator from Vancouver, BC. She is currently completing her Masters in Art History at York University.

Karilynn Ming Ho lives and works in Vancouver. She earned a BFA from Alberta College of Art and Design (2005) and a MFA from Simon Fraser University (2010). Working in the world of reality television programs, her artistic projects have been shown across Canada and internationally in solo and group exhibitions.