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Martin Leduc, Cordes, 2013-2015. Sculpture sonore cinétique, aluminium, électronique, algorithmes, 7 m de diamètre, 3 m de haut, mouvements et sons perpétuels.| Kinetic sound sculpture, aluminum, electronics, algorithms, 7 m in diameter, 3m high, perpetual motions and sounds. Avec l’aimable autorisation de l’artiste | Courtesy of the artist. Photo : Martin Leduc

Martin Leduc
From November 14th 2015 to December 19th 2015
Cordes : in situ / in city

*The artist will be present at OPTICA on December 12 and 19 from 3PM to 5 PM*

Martin Leduc is an artist of sound and of the moment. A Montrealer hailing from Île Perrot, Leduc draws inspiration from observing and listening to the cycles of nature, such as the steady yet ephemeral modulations of wind in the leaves or on the surface of water. As in his previous work, Cordes proposes a reflection on our relationship with the sound environment through a constantly renewed, infinitely variable auditory excursion. Suggestive of eolian phenomena, this kinetic instrument spatializes sound progressions that are constantly modified according to the movements it generates. As in the Heraclitean river that one cannot enter twice1, Cordes is a stream of sound that offers an entirely different listening experience at every audition.

This sculpture-instrument adopts the notion of controlled randomness, inspired by the probabilistic stochastic compositions of Iannis Xenakis, and combines it with a mobile hanging in the space, which recalls a peal of bells or an aeolian harp. Its particularity resides in creating an autonomous kinetic and audio progression, at once indeterminate and continuous, yielding a flow of interactions between space, time, and movement. Decidedly old-fashioned in the underlying emotions it kindles, it is also profoundly modern in conception. The work speaks to us of the technical know-how at work, which is extended into new technologies with which it shares a common cultural background. We are the innovative heirs or, as Régis Debray put it, we innovate by what we store. 2

Leduc proposes to discover other listening potentialities in situ, beyond the framework of recordings, performances, and sound synthesis. He invites audiences to a perceptual and sensory experience. He offers us a now all-too-rare and often neglected time-space of respite. Cordes thus becomes the tamed echo of a breath of nature, an in situ aside in the urban bustle, the fertile humus of reflection on our sound environment, a sound that marks the body as well as the mind.

1. Pradeau, J. F. (2004). Héraclite, Fragments. Paris : Flammarion, p. 102.
2. Debray, R. (2000). Introduction à la médiologie. Paris : PUF, p. 17.

Author: Louise Mongeau
Louise Mongeau studied social anthropology and ethnomusicology in Paris and in Montréal and social communications in Brussels.

1. Pradeau, J. F. (2004). Héraclite, Fragments. Paris : Flammarion, p. 102.
2. Debray, R. (2000). Introduction à la médiologie. Paris : PUF, p. 17.

PRESS RELEASE (pdf)

PRESS REVIEW
Poirier, Josianne (2016). «Martin Leduc : L'espace de la rêverie», Espace art actuel. no. 113, spring-summer, pp. 95-96.

Martin Leduc is completing a doctorate in art studies and practice at Université du Québec à Montréal. At the same time, he studied in electroacoustics at Université de Montréal. He draws inspiration from and appropriates various concepts and theories, especially the autopoiesis of Francesco Varela, the stochastics of Iannis Xenakis, Bernard Stiegler’s general organology, and Régis Debray’s mediology. He has presented his work in Brazil, in the United States, and in Québec, at the Jardin de Métis, among other venues.